The Global Warming Effect On Art & Design: Because The World Is Melting

published in: Design, Art By Costas Voyatzis, 08 August 2013

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THE EARTH MELTING ad campaign by VVL/BBDO, Belgium for WWF. Release date: June 2004.

As we all know, year after year, ice is melting at both of the Earth’s poles, sea levels are rising, ecosystems are changing and species that depend on one another are becoming more and more out of sync as heat waves, floods and droughts become more common across the globe and the amount of freshwater decreases. These are some of the most important effects of global warming on Nature which over the last few years have left their mark on the Art and Design World too!

EXTINCTION CAN'T BE FIXED ad campaign by BBDO, Spain for WWF. Release date: August 2013.

Today you will discover a collection of artworks that, according to Yatzer, look like they have been affected by our planet’s rising temperatures. Because even the Art & Design World is Melting. In reality however, these pieces are the result of high creativity and occasionally high temperatures until some of them reach their melting point. We have put them together in order to remind you that in the creative world, heat isn’t melting glaciers and sea ice but oil on canvases, ceramic glaze, glass and steel with some truly remarkable results. The signs of global warming are appearing everywhere; not even Superman can save us!

{Some simple actions you can take to help reduce global warming.}

''Nobody can save us...'' by Steve Lawler (Mojoko) and Eric Foenander. (2012)
The Melting Superman was a response to the title of the 2012 show Future Proof set in Singapore Art Museum.
photo © Mojoko.

Liquid lamp by Kouichi Okamoto. (2008)
photo © Kyouei Design.

Metamorphosis glass vase series by Jakub Berdych (Qubus). (2012)
photo © Gabriel Urbánek.

''Crystallization'' one of a kind dress by Iris Van Herpen. (2013)
Iris Van Herpen’s collaboration with Nick Knight and Daphne Guinness. More details here.

Surreal Melting Wall Clock
Inspired by
Salvador Dalí. {''The Persistence of Memory'' 1931. Oil on canvas, 9 1/2 x 13" (24.1 x 33 cm)}.

Morning mug by Lenka Czereova. (2009)
photo © Lenka Czereova.

Liquidated Chanel (Black) by ZEVS. (2011)
Liquitex on canvas // 48 x 24 inches // 122 x 61 cm.
Courtesy of the artist and De Buck Gallery, New York.

Liquidated YES by ZEVS. (2012)
mirror polished bronze on patinated bronze base.
36 1/2 x 36 x 10 1/2 inches // 93 x 91 x 27 cm // Edition of 4, + 2 AP.
Courtesy of the artist and De Buck Gallery, New York.

''Skate Fails'' limited edition ceramic skates by Apparatu with Alex Trochut. (2010)
Designed by Alex Trochut & Xavier Mañosa. Photo © Apparatu.

The Godiva store in Harajuku, Tokyo, Japan. Designed by Wonderwall. (2009)
photo © Kozo Takayama, Wonderwall.

Duramen Series by Bonsoir Paris. (2011)
Handmade Wooden Sculptures by Rémy Clémente and Morgan Maccari of Bonsoir Paris in collaboration with sculptor Adrien Coroller.
ART DIRECTION / DESIGN: Bonsoir Paris, SCULPTURE: Adrien Coroller, CABINET: Kwantiq, DESIGN / ACHIEVEMENT: Jules Cairon, PHOTOGRAPHY: Davina Muller, POST-PRODUCTION: Cedric Hugonnet.

Duramen Series by Bonsoir Paris, photo © Davina Muller.

Duramen Series by Bonsoir Paris, photo © Davina Muller.

'Quelle Fête' by Rotganzen. (2012)
Quelle Fête II, 2012. photo © Rick Messemaker.

Quelle Fête I. Commission by Rotganzen for Wenneker Pand, Schiedam, 2011. Photo by Renz Tango.

''Splash of Wonder'' by Johnson TSANG (曾章成). (2011)
Stainless steel and glass sculpture.
photo © Johnson TSANG Cheung Shing (曾章成).

(detail) ''Splash of Wonder'' by Johnson TSANG (曾章成). (2011). Photo © Johnson TSANG Cheung Shing (曾章成).

 

''Shaping Fluid'' ceramic series by Christina Schou Christensen. (2013)
photo © Christina Schou Christensen.

''Shaping Fluid'' ceramic series by Christina Schou Christensen. (2013). Photo © Christina Schou Christensen.

''Hot With A Chance Of A Late Storm'' sculpture by James Dive. (2006)
The sculpture was unveiled at the 2006 Sculpture by the Sea in Sydney. P
hoto © James Dive .

Jesus dripping in paint by Amelia Beamish. (2010)
photo © Amelia Beamish.

''Nomad Patterns'' melting ceramic series by Livia Marin. (2012)
photo © Sachiyo Nishimura.

''Nomad Patterns'' melting ceramic series by Livia Marin. (2012). Photo © Sachiyo Nishimura.

Melting collection by Maarten Baas for Dom Ruinart. (2009)
photo ©
Ruinart.

Melting collection by Maarten Baas for Dom Ruinart. (2009). Photo © Ruinart.

The three dimension sculptures of Daniel Arsham. (2006+)
Mirror Error, 2012, photo © Daniel Arsham.

Floor Drip, 2011, photo © Daniel Arsham.

Melted Table by AAstudio. (2012)
photo © AAstudio.

Crystal Virus series by Pieke bergmans. (2008+)
Mother Of Pearl Meets Crystal Virus, 2008, photo © Pieke Bergmans / Design Virus.

Light In The Dark, 2010, photo © Pieke Bergmans / Design Virus.

TIPSY Melting Glasses by Loris & Livia. (2011)
The intervention on the traditional Duralex Picardie Glass by Loris & Livia for DesignMarketo. Available for purchase here.
photo © James Champion.

TIPSY Melting Glasses by Loris & Livia. (2011). photo © James Champion.

''Mizukagami Water Mirrors'' by Rikako Nagashim and acrylic designer Hideto Hyoudou. (2011)
photo © Nagashim & Hyoudou.

 

The AGONIST fragrances of Christine Gustafsson and Niclas Lydeen. (2008+)
All the fragrances are artistically sculptured in handcrafted Swedish glass created in collaboration with the award-winning glassartist Āsa Jungnelius at Kosta Boda.
photo © Agonist Parfums.

Liquid Glacial Table by Zaha Hadid Architects for David Gill Galeries. (2012)
photo © Jacopo Spilimbergo.

Liquid Glacial Table by Zaha Hadid Architects for David Gill Galeries. (2012). Photo © Jacopo Spilimbergo.

Melting House III by Erwin Wurm. (2010)
Courtesy Galerie Thaddaeus Ropac, Salzburg/ Paris.
photo © Jesse Willems
.

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{Remember to watch once again the ''HOME'' documentary by Yann Arthus-Bertrand.}

sources:

Yatzer

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