Catalina Fernández Pastry Boutique in San Pedro, Mexico

published in: Interiors By Guest, 22 March 2012

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photo © Anagrama

Guest article by Maria Passarivaki

Tequilas and sombreros aside, the city of San Pedro - in Nuevo León, Mexico - is bang on trend with the ‘revolutionary design’ term with some of its local stores that integrate conceptual design and food culture. Traditionally serving baked goods in the form of a typical home based bakery since 1988, it offers traditional recipes in an innovative pastry shop and thus, for any local pastry-goers, Catalina Fernández's main attraction in the future won’t be only the shop’s baked goodies, but its attention to detail.

The popular Catalina Fernández bakery is celebrated for its progressive perception of a pastry shop whilst sustaining traditional recipes. Under the direction of Anagrama, which is the brand agency to introduce in-store design concepts and brand development strategies, the Catalina Fernández bakery experience will never look the same again. For a start, Anagrama has ensured for a more sophisticated twist to the brand’s identity and a sans serif typeface logo (CF) was thereby introduced. Chic packaging boxes and bags complete with golden foil were printed and Anagrama also oversaw massive changes in the store's interiors.

photo © Anagrama

The concept behind its design touches on the 1970s; it is futuristic yet old fashioned. At first glance, it looks like a reception hall where the characteristic minimal logo (CF) welcoming guests. Its tall ceilings on a vertical structure with shelves above the refrigerators let the store breath and are a feast for the eyes. Packages of sugar, flour, and yeast placed all over the pastry shop make the inner part of the shop look quite similar to a warehouse/kitchen. The ‘boutique’ color palette is a blend of black and white where contemporary furnishings contrast with the old white brick wall, embodied with hidden lighting. The result; the pastry shop becomes the ultimate eye candy to complement the delicacies on offer.



Besides the architectural project, it seems that there is a concrete plan for the future. What works in San Pedro will potentially spread out to the rest of the world as Catalina Fernández plans to expand its brand and open more boutique pastry branches thus approaching a wider audience.

All in all, such innovative design and food concepts test the consumer nous bringing new brand strategies into the realm of excellence and success. Most of all, they further cultivate our taste buds into another dimension.

photo © Anagrama

photo © Anagrama

photo © Anagrama

photo © Anagrama

photo © Anagrama

photo © Anagrama

photo © Anagrama

photo © Anagrama

sources:

Anagrama

  • friend
    Ben Rivers | 2012-03-25 23:30:31

    San Pedro is located in the metropolitan area of Monterrey, Nuevo Leon, not Coahuila.

  • friend
    Abraham De la Rosa | 2012-03-28 06:33:57

    It's true. San Pedro is a city in Nuevo León, Mexico and Anagrama is a studio from the same city here in Nuevo León.

  • friend
    Abraham Padilla | 2012-04-06 21:10:25

    I honestly don't like it, it lacks of mexican identity, mexican are more colorful and this is to sober, it's kind a european influence. We have many many good characteristics and I personally can't see them here...

  • friend
    Nora Melendez | 2012-06-02 00:35:36

    The whole objective of the project was for it not to look mexican! It is a store created by mexicans with a great mexican branding firm behind it.

  • friend
    Rodrigo Caudillo | 2012-06-05 05:07:32

    By reading your comment Abraham, I cannot agree with you. The project itself denotes an implicit mexican identity. Look at the treatment of the walls; paint over brick. If you travel to the poorest areas in Mexico, people living in there paint their basic walls with the only luxury they can afford, paint-color. Instead, the idea of the European influence that you bring up to attention, it is denied by the last statement. The European train of thought would be horrified by the action of covering the brick with color. Another example in the project that denotes the Mexican idiosyncrasy, are the shape of the cans full (or empty?) sugar, flour and milk. In the Mexican people mind that shape it is easily identifiable. In simpler words, I invite you think out of the box.

  • friend
    Alex | 2013-12-10 16:44:15

    Even if it had no Mexican identity at all, which I think is false, why in hell should it have one. This is design and the designer's skill is shown in being able to present whatever identity the brand wants. You want everything in Mexico to look the same? Without any window to something different and new? You want people to stop innovating but within certain confinements? Identity is formed over time anyway, A lot of what is called "Mexican identity" comes from Spanish "unmexican" things as those that are Spanish, French, European or from the United States, and that isn't wrong or bad, that is what Mexico is. Not a specific brand of indigenous people, nor solely the Spanish influenced "indians", or the French Porfirian Mexicans. Identity continues to evolve, it is what it is, forcing it to the past within new design is just sad for a culture.

  • friend
    nora melendez | 2012-04-17 21:45:58

    La boutique de reposteria de Catalina Fernandez es un ejemplo mas del ingenio artistico mexicano.Felicidades!

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