Altered Appliances by Piet Zwart Institute Students

published in: Design, Gastronomy By Al Ex Quisite, 14 April 2013

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ROLLWARE: Edible Dishware
By Joanne Choueiri, Giulia Cosenza, Povilas Raskevicius
photo © Willem de Kooning Academy & Piet Zwart Institute

Dutch Institutes are renowned for their experimental and innovative projects where students get to explore the limits of design, then incorporating it into an array of miscellaneous fields. Recently, students from the Masters of Interior Architecture & Retail Design (MIARD) Programme of The Piet Zwart Institute, Rotterdam, developed the 'ALTERED APPLIANCES' project which investigates how low-tech appliances can be repurposed into alternative design tools for new experiences in the kitchen. Following their research on how kitchen-oriented appliances have historically been used, the students looked at how these same appliances can be used within different parameters. The resulting eye catching projects were presented through a “live demonstration” at Ventura Lambrate during Milan Design Week 2013.

ROLLWARE: Edible Dishware
By Joanne Choueiri, Giulia Cosenza, Povilas Raskevicius
photo © Willem de Kooning Academy & Piet Zwart Institute


ROLLWARE: Edible Dishware
By Joanne Choueiri, Giulia Cosenza, Povilas Raskevicius
photo © Willem de Kooning Academy & Piet Zwart Institute

ROLLWARE
by Joanne Choueiri, Giulia Cosenza and Povilas Raskevicius

What may initially look like a children’s toy for rolling out play dough is actually a ''serious'' laser-cut rolling pin designed for baking your own edible dishware. Although it sounds surrealistic, after watching the video above you’ll have the opportunity to see how this typical culinary tool has been transformed into a human-powered fabrication device. ‘Rollware’ developed by Joanne Choueiri, Giulia Cosenza and Povilas Raskevicius, has been laser cut with elaborate patterns. The rolling pins which come in sets are used for three separate functions, the first and most obvious, rolling the dough flat, the second, imprinting the design onto the dough and the third, cutting the dough into a plate size circle. The dough-plate is then baked and used as a substitute for plastic disposable dishes which instead of being disposed of, can be eaten.

ROLLWARE: Edible Dishware
By Joanne Choueiri, Giulia Cosenza, Povilas Raskevicius
photo © Willem de Kooning Academy & Piet Zwart Institute

ROLLWARE: Edible Dishware
By Joanne Choueiri, Giulia Cosenza, Povilas Raskevicius
photo © Willem de Kooning Academy & Piet Zwart Institute

ROLLWARE: Edible Dishware
By Joanne Choueiri, Giulia Cosenza, Povilas Raskevicius
photo © Willem de Kooning Academy & Piet Zwart Institute

EXTRUDOUGH: Biodegradable Tableware
By Bo Baalman, Kine Solberg
photo © Willem de Kooning Academy & Piet Zwart Institute

EXTRUDOUGH
by Bo Baalman and Kine Solberg

EXTRUDOUGH’ is a series of tableware, not edible this time but biodegradable, been designed by Bo Baalman and Kine Solberg who modified a meat grinder to process differently coloured doughs to produce various shaped moulds that are then dried at room temperature.

EXTRUDOUGH: Biodegradable Tableware
By Bo Baalman, Kine Solberg
photo © Willem de Kooning Academy & Piet Zwart Institute

EXTRUDOUGH: Biodegradable Tableware
By Bo Baalman, Kine Solberg
photo © Willem de Kooning Academy & Piet Zwart Institute

EXTRUDOUGH: Biodegradable Tableware
By Bo Baalman, Kine Solberg
photo © Willem de Kooning Academy & Piet Zwart Institute

EXTRUDOUGH: Biodegradable Tableware
By Bo Baalman, Kine Solberg
photo © Willem de Kooning Academy & Piet Zwart Institute


CONEformation: A Measuring Set
By Maddalena Gioglio, Egle Tuleikyte
photo © Willem de Kooning Academy & Piet Zwart Institute

CONEformation
by Maddalena Gioglio and Egle Tuleikyte

In the same low-tech mood, Maddalena Gioglio and Egle Tuleikyte developed a seductively primitive set of measuring cones that can also be used as mixing bowls as well as serving vessels. For their ‘CONEformation’ project, the students repurposed typical measuring funnels in order to pour six precise quantities of granulated materials into mounds, which after hardening, were covered in slip ceramic. The final result is a set of six unique vessels that can be used for measuring food amounts.

CONEformation: A Measuring Set
By Maddalena Gioglio, Egle Tuleikyte
photo © Willem de Kooning Academy & Piet Zwart Institute

CONEformation: A Measuring Set
By Maddalena Gioglio, Egle Tuleikyte
photo © Willem de Kooning Academy & Piet Zwart Institute

CONEformation: A Measuring Set
By Maddalena Gioglio, Egle Tuleikyte
photo © Willem de Kooning Academy & Piet Zwart Institute

CONEformation: A Measuring Set
By Maddalena Gioglio, Egle Tuleikyte
photo © Willem de Kooning Academy & Piet Zwart Institute

FLIP FOOD: LUNCHBOX
By Ilias Markolefas, Nathalia Martinez Saavedra
photo © Willem de Kooning Academy & Piet Zwart Institute

FLIP FOOD
by Ilias Markolefas and Nathalia Martinez Saavedra

Ilias Markolefas and Nathalia Martinez Saavedra on the other hand, decided to take their culinary tools out of the kitchen and into the realm of the carry around lunch or picnic. Their ingenious lunch box consists of a cutting board, a pizza cutter and a cookie stamp. Using the equipment, users can cut, emboss, stamp, fold and join away to their heart’s content to produce six compartments which can store different types of food. Their project named ‘FLIP FOOD is reminiscent of the traditional brown paper bag, usually used as lunch carrier, and is also accompanied by reusable plastic containers for ‘cooked food’ that perfectly fit into the compartments. As recyclable paper is used to create them, the lunchboxes can be thrown away after several uses. After that, a new one can easily be produced.

FLIP FOOD: LUNCHBOX
By Ilias Markolefas, Nathalia Martinez Saavedra
photo © Willem de Kooning Academy & Piet Zwart Institute

FLIP FOOD: LUNCHBOX
By Ilias Markolefas, Nathalia Martinez Saavedra
photo © Willem de Kooning Academy & Piet Zwart Institute

FLIP FOOD: LUNCHBOX
By Ilias Markolefas, Nathalia Martinez Saavedra
photo © Willem de Kooning Academy & Piet Zwart Institute

FLIP FOOD: LUNCHBOX
By Ilias Markolefas, Nathalia Martinez Saavedra
photo © Willem de Kooning Academy & Piet Zwart Institute

FLIP FOOD: LUNCHBOX
By Ilias Markolefas, Nathalia Martinez Saavedra
photo © Willem de Kooning Academy & Piet Zwart Institute

FLIP FOOD: LUNCHBOX
By Ilias Markolefas, Nathalia Martinez Saavedra
photo © Willem de Kooning Academy & Piet Zwart Institute

sources:

ALTERED APPLIANCES, Willem de Kooning Academy, Piet Zwart Institute

  • friend
    lovedesigninspire | 2013-04-16 16:14:24

    Love it! great idea to create shapes and patterns using rolling pins...would be interesting to see these hit the shelves in the near future.

  • friend
    Kat Mourginaki | 2013-05-21 15:51:47

    SO INSPIRING. SO BEAUTIFUL.SO EXCEPTIONAL.SO USEFUL. LOVE / KAT

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