Icons by Jan Plechac

published in: Design By Marcia Argyriades, 09 May 2011

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photo by Tomas Brabec

When we think of iconic furniture pieces, pieces such as the Louis Chair, the 101 year old Kubus Chair by Josef Hoffmann, the Red Blue Chair (1917) by Gerrit Rietveld, the Eames Walnut Stool, and the Fatboy Chair will definitely cross your minds among others. Czech designer Jan Plechac deals with these iconic furniture pieces in a graphic attempt through the study of lines.

Red Blue Chair, photo by Kristina Hrabetova

Red Blue Chair, photo by Kristina Hrabetova

The Icons seating furniture collection is a challenge to delete the fine line which distinguishes exterior and interior furniture, and furthermore interior and exterior as such.   The relationship between function and form are the ideas drawn from the stories Plechac attempted to create as to select these iconic forms by redefining them in new contexts of a mentally contrasting environment.  By the means of dematerialization the iconic furniture pieces have been transformed into lightweight wire structures for the usage of exterior furniture.  A graphic shortcut such as the contour line created the wire furniture frame by copying these iconic designs; gradually, the contour line was developed into real wire frame furniture

Red Blue Chair, photo by Kristina Hrabetova

Louis Chair, photo by Kristina Hrabetova

But how was the selection made?  Which piece would make it to Plechac’s transformation list?  The criteria was by setting priorities such as design popularity and how much that certain object of style was known amongst the public.  For instance the Louis Chair according to the designer is the most famous icon whose typical curves represented a very rewarding theme for wire lines.  On the other hand, the Kubus Chair fascinated Plechac for its geometry, and the clear modernity in its design.   With the new desig  Plechac  achieved the maximum possible contrast between the material model and the transient wire interpretation; the wire version emphasized the geometrical and graphic accuracy of the upholstered armchair.
 

Louis Chair, photo by Kristina Hrabetova

 

Louis Chair, photo by Kristina Hrabetova

photo by Tomas Brabec

The element and the absence of color was another criteria for the selection of Rietveld’s Red Blue Chair.  Additionally, the geometric shapes in the Eames Walnut Stool are translated into rotational shapes.  Last but not least, the selection of the Fatboy lounge bag was the challenge which would finish off this selection.  The amorphous blob like lounge bag has no particular form as it changes with the use.  It differs in material, structure and it is meant to act in a transforming manner; to shape the amorphous blob into a specific wire-structured shape was a challenge as the transformation took a carefully study of the geometry, the lines, and the shape that the wire structure should have so as to also be comfortable. 
 
The collection was part of Jan Plechac’s diploma work as it “focuses on the attempt to evoke new emotions by means of old memories, on the clash of clearly defined forms and natural contingencies, and on their consonance.”

Fatboy Chair, photo by Kristina Hrabetova

Fatboy Chair, photo by Kristina Hrabetova

Kubus Chair, photo by Kristina Hrabetova

 

Kubus Chair, photo by Kristina Hrabetova

Walnut stool, photo by Kristina Hrabetova

sources:

Jan Plechac

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TAGS: MILAN 2011
  • friend
    Richard R. | 2011-05-12 15:36:09

    Stripping the chairs to their essentials and re-interpreting them based on their lines is brilliant. I've been enjoying Plechak's work for some time and I really love how you presented this aspect of it. Thanks!

  • friend
    Roxana | 2011-07-15 23:54:48

    I enjoyed this article so much! I am browsing your site for 2 hours now and the articles are more and more interesting for me! This idea is brilliant but I would have loved to see some Charles Eames or some of Alvar Aalto's work. They really are classics!!!

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