The house of architect Sharon Fraser in Australia

published in: Architecture, Interiors By Tina Komninou, 24 May 2009

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photo © Richard Powers

When an architect such as Sharon Fraser that is personal and so passionate about her work - choosing to retain a small practice due to personal contact with her clients – completes her personal residence, we have to stop and pay attention. The house which is situated in Byron Bay, Australia was completed in 2008 after great detailing and a sense of bringing the outside in.

photo © Richard Powers

photo © Richard Powers

One of its key features is its U shaped plan taking advantage of its surrounding views throughout the day, which has acted as a key factor in the allocation of the interior spaces according to the day to day activities. The exterior area is designed to engage the family activities and allow for the understanding of an open space with no inhabitations. The contrast between the water in the pool and the hard surface fire place engaging water and fire situated parallel to each other symbolise the unity of elements which is incorporated throughout this project.

photo © Richard Powers

photo © Richard Powers

photo © Richard Powers

The large openings express a space with no reservations or restrictions engaging it with the landscape. The sculptural artwork which is created by Peter McLisky, through its playfulness, its sense of scale and the introduction of colour expresses an element that engages once more the inside through symbolism. The whole interior permanent structure is treated with a white backdrop. This way colour is only present in the furniture and the upholstery treating it as an art gallery were all items are exclusive and unique. This is certainly what is expected from an architect that her goal is to strive for perfection.

photo © Richard Powers

photo © Richard Powers

photo © Richard Powers

photo © Richard Powers

The interior spaces are grand and have a generosity to their scale and ambience. They incorporate a welcoming and warm atmospherity through the deep coloured slide partitions and the earthly finishes incorporated in the lounge. Every detail is processed through with great sensitivity and innovation. One example is the massive pivot doors that open to the shaded colonnade. Fraser has also designed some of the furniture pieces emphasising the importance of exclusivity within the interior and the uniqness of the personal character of every space.

Another element which we admire about this residence is the ecological factor, which is also incorporated. There has been allowance for water collection and there is photovoltaic cells positioned in the roof top that generate electricity along with a hydronic system heating up the concrete slab which is produced by the solar hot water.

At this day and age it is very inspiring to see that there are still architects that care about the perfection of a project by choosing to remain small scale and don’t wish to be mass produced. Sharon Fraser believes in the individuality of a client and the importance of fully focusing in the uniqueness of every project and reaching its full potential. She is an architect which we admire her perception, as after all we have a soft spot for all that is one of a kind, personal, boutique and everyone that keeps there design quality at the top. A pure example 'LESS IS MORE".

photo © Richard Powers

photo © Richard Powers

photo © Richard Powers

photo © Richard Powers

photo © Richard Powers

photo © Richard Powers

photo © Richard Powers

sources:

Richard Powers

  • friend
    yatzerina | 2009-05-25 09:10:17

    Very Beautiful, very Inspiring, great space combined with harmonic ambience..... Good to know that Ecology was also considered as an important factor!

  • friend
    royal creme | 2009-05-26 19:22:08

    It is certainly an architect's home. I had hoped for perhaps more surprise.

  • friend
    Kyle | 2009-05-27 05:38:08

    what do you do about bugs??

  • friend
    sharon | 2009-06-09 04:35:34

    hi, this is the architect Sharon Fraser here. In answer to the question on "bugs", the house is fully screened. In some instances, the screens are concealed when not in use. Hope that answers the question.

  • friend
    Kim | 2013-05-02 03:41:42

    Hi Sharon - im interest to know what size Scyon Linea cladding you used? .

  • friend
    Erwin | 2009-06-15 12:31:07

    This is a great example of the typical Australian (and New Zealand) no nonsence architecture I like so much. I am from Belgium, and I was in Byron Bay for 2 days in 2007 with my family. Enough to lust for a house there! But I am designing our own black-outside-white-inside passive modernist house in Belgium and I hope to post pictures of it here one day.

  • friend
    Penny | 2012-05-04 17:58:09

    Beautiful home. What material was used for the fenced in look?

  • friend
    Monica | 2012-05-05 04:35:41

    Me encanto!!! diseño claro, abierto....muy lindo!!!

  • friend
    L Robertson | 2012-08-03 07:38:57

    aesthetically pleasing. not too much/ not too little. I enjoy the way way one's eye travels around the home rather than tours looking for something to 'surprise'. Architects homes like any home should have a personality and this home does. My next home in the middle of nowhere will be just the somewhere I want to be if I can get a hold of this architect!

  • friend
    Peter Scorer | 2013-01-28 14:57:44

    You know it's Australian when you see jalousie windows and glass-fenced pools. :)

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